87 Leonard Street - Tribeca
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87 Leonard

Sometime around 1860, a businessman by the name of John Ransom, contracted with an architect and builder, whose names have been lost to the sands of time, to build a seven-story building to house his manufacturing business.

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 It would be a building in a new style made popular by inventor and architect, James Bogardus, featuring iron columns that reminded people of the whale-oil candles popular in the day, soaring ceilings, oversized double-sashed windows, and double-thick brick walls.  The building would lead a business life over the years, housing sock and stocking companies, companies that manufactured pianos, and others. But, it would be more than a century and a half before the company found its true calling, before it would be painstakingly restored, outfitted with the finest features, and positioned as seven of the finest residences in Tribeca.  For years, companies called it “headquarters.” Now a few very fortunate people will call it “home.”

It would be a building in a new style made popular by inventor and architect, James Bogardus, featuring iron columns that reminded people of the whale-oil candles popular in the day, soaring ceilings, oversized double-sashed windows, and double-thick brick walls.

The building would lead a business life over the years, housing sock and stocking companies, companies that manufactured pianos, and others. But, it would be more than a century and a half before the company found its true calling, before it would be painstakingly restored, outfitted with the finest features, and positioned as seven of the finest residences in Tribeca.

For years, companies called it “headquarters.” Now a few very fortunate people will call it “home.”

 Changing a 150-year-old factory into exceptional residences is less of a renovation and more of a recasting. In the instance of 87 Leonard, the job entailed protecting its story by preserving its architectural integrity. Virtually all of the architectural elements that communicate its Italianate style – cast iron Corinthian columns, oversized windows, and period hardware – were carefully renewed. Its worn floors of wide oak plank, exposed hewn beamsand double-thick brick walls pay respect to its history.  Couple those elements with contemporary features such as state-of-the-art climate control, radiant heated floors, and chef-inspired kitchens with a carefully curated mix of materials and appliances, and a building that once felt the toil of manufacture addresses all of the comforts of home.

Changing a 150-year-old factory into exceptional residences is less of a renovation and more of a recasting. In the instance of 87 Leonard, the job entailed protecting its story by preserving its architectural integrity. Virtually all of the architectural elements that communicate its Italianate style – cast iron Corinthian columns, oversized windows, and period hardware – were carefully renewed. Its worn floors of wide oak plank, exposed hewn beamsand double-thick brick walls pay respect to its history.

Couple those elements with contemporary features such as state-of-the-art climate control, radiant heated floors, and chef-inspired kitchens with a carefully curated mix of materials and appliances, and a building that once felt the toil of manufacture addresses all of the comforts of home.